Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

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thirtyframesasecond
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1101 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Wed Oct 28, 2020 9:46 am

Have to make sure I set Film Four to record on Saturday

Eight more days til Halloween, Halloween, Halloween
Eight more days til Halloween, Silver Shamrock!

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1102 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Wed Oct 28, 2020 9:50 am

Ike Barinholtz is easily the best thing in The Mindy Project. Would he make Blockers worth seeing when I have serious reservations about John Cena and Leslie Mann?

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1103 Post by jlnight » Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:13 am

My Six Loves, Tue 3rd Nov, Talking Pictures.

Hell's Half Acre, Wed 4th Nov, Talking Pictures. Also late Sat 14th Nov.
The French Connection, starts Wed 4th Nov, Sony Movies Action.

Heller in Pink Tights, Fri 6th Nov, Talking Pictures.
Centrespread, late Fri 6th Nov, London Live.

Dressed to Kill (1946), Sat 7th Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Tue 10th Nov.
Exorcist: The Beginning, Sat 7th Nov, Horror.
Perfect 10 (LFF 2019), Sat 7th Nov, BBC2.
Climax, Sat 7th Nov, Film4.

Paris When it Sizzles, Sun 8th Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Thu 12th Nov.

Don't Be Silly (Play For Today), Tue 10th Nov, BBC4.
Sauvage (2018), late Tue 10th Nov, Channel 4.

Bacurau, late Wed 11th Nov, Film4.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1104 Post by colinr0380 » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:21 pm

Very late in noting this but also this evening BBC2 has shown Alex Gibney's documentary on the Coronavirus pandemic Totally Under Control: Trump and Covid-19.

Interestingly it looks as if Beatriz At Dinner has not had an official theatrical or home video release in the UK as yet, so it has never been BBFC certificated (though amusingly the Daily Mail has pre-emptively slapped it with their own 18 rating and "Particularly liable to offend" warning in their listing! Its not that bad and I am sure that despite the swearing and moment of violence would pretty much fall into the 15, or even 12, category if it were certificated) and the screening on BBC2 is its first screening in the UK in any form outside of a film festival setting. BBC2 also did a surprise mid-afternoon repeat screening of Miguel Arteta's previous film Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day last week as well, perhaps in anticipation, which I went into with some concerns about it being a Diary of a Wimpy Kid-style film and it turned out to be much better than that.
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1105 Post by colinr0380 » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:52 pm

"I'm so embarrassed. Do you think I should just go say something?"

Beatriz at Dinner is a fascinating film about different worlds colliding and thinking that they can exist within the same sphere (reminding me a little of The Lobster in some ways). Despite focusing entirely on Beatriz as the main character I do not exactly think that its all about the one way clashing of someone aggrieved against the brutal property developers because whilst the guests at the dinner party are pretty awful and only interested in talk of land development and money (and interestingly not being at all interested in art, such as their being impatient with the song. Which might be the flaw of the film, that it is letting art get away guilt free from this situation without taking any culpability?) there is some space there to show Beatriz is a bit extreme too and not entirely someone that the audience should be fully in league with either. Some of the 'broad' aspects that make the rich bourgeoisie distant from us as viewers also fall onto her as well, with Beatriz herself pushed to extremes in the other direction by doing 'wacky' things such as keeping goats as pets and having rather wild ideas about soul reincarnation and massage therapy as a healing technique. Those are 'nicer' traits than those that Doug and the other guests at the dinner show, but they are still extreme in their own way.

Beatriz is also prone to philosophising but in the 'safe space' of her role as massage therapist, where her clients (as we see with Cathy early on in the film) expect a bit of the mystical tantric wide-eyed empathy stuff as part of the whole touchy-feely massage therapy package, likely as something that provides that a little extra psychosomatic placebo-like relaxation. That is kind of the point of having someone like Beatriz around perhaps. She had already fulfilled her primary functional therapeutic role to the daughter of the family long before the film started (the daughter tellingly never appears outside of photographs) and Cathy appears to have 'appropriated' the therapy appointments that Beatriz was doing for the daughter for herself in the daughter's absence. Which is already a little morally iffy on both sides - Cathy perhaps wanting to keep giving Beatriz employment out of some sense of obligation, or worse having used her daughter's cancer carer as a 'tester' and then after seeing the results got a bit jealous and has kept her for herself. Beatriz does not come out of this unsullied on her part by continuing this job long after her original role was over, perhaps for a connection to the daughter (but then again the daughter is long gone) and perhaps for the money? Perhaps even for the prestige that going to visit a gated community for 'private sessions' gives her that her normal job does not? As Cathy says later on (though its just a standard response on her part, providing a pat response that explains her behaviour without having to go any deeper into things) Beatriz is 'burnt out'.

But why is Beatriz burnt out? Is it her job tending to the sick? The issue over her neighbour killing her goat and maybe losing her other animals? The looks she gives at the polluting smokestacks and the spreading oil slicks in the ocean (which may just be in her mind?) stressing her out mentally? Or is it something that even she does not want to fully address, which is that she herself has been complicit in allowing the world to exist the way it does. From thinking that she can ignore the demands of her neighbours and the zoning permits regarding her animals until it is too late; of looking at the smoke stacks yet driving her car all the same, even though it pointedly breaks down for the majority of the film and eventually gets towed away; and that she has been looking after this rich family without fully realising the nature of them until the accident of staying to dinner made it impossible to stay naive. Did Beatriz always know that the issues were as much within her as going on in the outside world? That her own internal karma was a bit out of balance with her lofty ambitions? And it took being treated as a guest (getting overly elevated?) to make her realise how little she had in common with the people she is ostensibly on an equal footing with?

I do really like that whilst Doug is obviously the most crass figure (everything from the casual swearing to talking about business around the dinner table, to feeling able to steer the course of the conversation into potentially uncomfortable topics with impunity because everyone will follow his lead) Beatriz herself can come across as a bit gauche too, and her attempts to stand on equal footing (making a second toast straight after Doug's; starting up conversations that can only lead to trouble when really as an unplanned guest anyone else would just sit there and try to remain as inconspicuous as possible; and of course the fundamental faux pas of thinking that anybody else in that room gives a damn about what she thinks and at best are just humouring her interjections) turn her into a bit of an extremist to match Doug. All of the other characters occupying the 'middle ground' of the situation are superficially skimming over the surface of conversations and can all operate within the same common frame of comfortable reference with each other (I love that early moment of Beatriz starting up a conversation with the three other women by talking about the daughter's cancer care and her philosophical approach to therapy which swiftly segues into the other women chatting about a reality star's compromising leaked photos! Which kind of (accidentally?) cuts Beatriz out of the conversation both because she does not know who they are talking about and because it sort of puts her soul baring attempt at deep conversation swiftly in its place as equivalent to empty chatter, or even less important than that. Throughout the rest of the film the women's roles in that dinner are to 'soften' the tone with their asides that undermine the seriousness of talk and keep things running at that superficial, slick, friction-less level), whilst Doug and Beatriz are tussling for dominance. But Doug does not have to struggle as he is who the dinner is in honour of and he is also upbeat and happy, treating everything lightly, even the subject of death. Whilst Beatriz is not meant to be there and keeps talking about everything from the daughter and her cancer (who the other women listen to for just as long as they need to then move on from as quickly as possible even when Cathy talks about her) to being incensed at the actions of the businessmen and Doug's proud posed hunting photograph. Beatriz may be in the right but is not being appropriate for the situation she is in, because there is no way she will come out of this as a victor, even a moral one because of how compromised she is within the situation that she is operating in.

I do find it amusing that it is the (hired in for the occasion) catering staff who are just trying to do their jobs, and especially that waiter who she interrupts and then also has to make special accommodations in the menu for her vegetarianism, is the one who is the first one to get annoyed by Beatriz! Because she is getting in the way of him being able to do his own job effectively! (Similarly the two guys at the dinner are just trying to 'do their job' by this dinner being important for the deal they are making. I do like that whilst they treat Doug like an old friend, that Doug himself appears to be a bit bored by their superficial sycophancy too and may even be enjoying the banter with Beatriz as someone finally pulling him up short on some of his actions! But of course that is probably more enjoyment in an 'after dinner entertainment' kind of way than anything deeper than that!)

Viewed uncharitably, Beatriz would be someone needing to 'calm down' about the environmental disasters and injustices big and small that she cannot prevent (made a few years later and I am sure she would be getting offered CBT courses to 'change her thinking' as a casual fix all solution to her stress. And isn't it ironic in some ways that the massage therapist is the one most weighed down by the world? Perhaps it is like that old adage that the best hairdressers are the ones with the worst haircuts, because they cannot cut their own hair!). But does she need her thinking to be changed to be as superficially happy as the rest of the characters? At least she feels some sense of responsibility for the state of things beyond just the next business deal or the upkeep of the mansion. But at the same time she has no ability to transfer those feelings into positive action, just the two extreme destructive paths of murder or suicide.

In a way Doug and Beatriz are the 'deep thinkers/feelers' having an actual interesting philosophical clash together (which is ruining the slick dinner party and perhaps making it more memorable than it should be to work to its intended purpose!). And perhaps Beatriz is closer to Doug than she might wish to admit, feeling the same impulse to kill that Doug treats so casually that she grieves for feeling seething within her. However even though she realises that murder will not solve anything (and would reduce her to another aggrieved aggressor that can be easily brushed aside as 'crazy') unfortunately that leaves her nowhere to put her feelings but into a suicidal place. Because otherwise doing nothing, returning to her life and never seeing that family or Doug again whilst they go on pillaging without consequence would mean she has been marginalised into non-existence in an even more cruelly mundane way than the more poetic way in which we leave the film, with the elite metaphorically floating off carefree (for now) into the sky whilst the downtrodden literally sink without trace beneath the dark ocean waves.
___

I particularly liked the couple of moments involving the characters passing around a mobile phone to show a picture (the moment with showing the reality star's intimate leaked photograph, and then Doug's hunting photo), which is quite an aggressive feeling act of almost forcing your intimate life onto other people and expecting people to have a certain reaction to it whether they approve of what they see or not. That act gets interestingly contrasted against the one way messages that Beatriz leaves begging for information (or connection) with a person from her past. Someone who could confirm her suspicions and tell her she is not alone in her concerns or view of the world (whilst Doug is constantly surrounded by sycophants who would agree with anything!), but she never gets that return call. So she has to continue drowning her troubles in that wine bottle.

I did quite like the few amusing allusions towards the real life events such as the big game hunter photo controversy and Doug getting cream pied just like Rupert Murdoch in that phone hacking hearing. Even to that trend of a few years back of superficial displays of 'deep feeling' by setting off paper lanterns at parties.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1106 Post by colinr0380 » Mon Nov 02, 2020 7:07 pm

The Children Act

"Have you ever been wild and free, Nigel?"
"No never, thank God"

I am not entirely sure whether all of the following is going to make much sense or is going to come out as a garbled mess but I thought I would throw a response together quickly after watching this film this evening. This was a very impressive film tackling a really complicated subject about the right that others have (officially or in their respective roles within private relationships) and the inevitable toll and difficulty that a High Court judge in particular has of having to pass dispassionate, binding legal judgment on utterly irrational matters of human behaviour. As in many an Ian McEwan story it is not really specifically a case about a Jehovah's Witness ethical dilemma, although that is the 'central, marketable hook' for the drama, than being more about that one particular case standing in for all of the people passed judgment on before this point and for those who will be inevitably be judged in the future (it is probably not unintentional that the opening ethical dilemma that Fiona is passing judgment on is about separating conjoined twins even if that means killing one of them for certain, like a modern day version of the Judgement of Solomon). And also more generally the difficult and maybe impossible process of projecting oneself into the thoughts and feelings of others to try and understand them better. But is doing so only something which only highlights the flaws in the eye of the beholder more clearly, their own needs and desires that blind them to the 'truth' of situations?

The High Court judge here has arguably kind of ruined someone's life and refuses to take responsibility for it (much as with her husband, despite his attempts to speak with her about his issues). The young man that she signs off on forcing to have a blood transfusion against his wishes gets transformed into a low-key stalker after that 'saves' his life (reminiscent a little of Judi Dench in Richard Eyre's film of Notes On A Scandal! Or McEwan's own story, Enduring Love) which ironically causes her own marital troubles and husband's resolve to have an affair to get affection from somewhere if not from her amusingly rebound back onto Fiona herself, as she gets her own opportunity to have a relationship (and emotional re-awakening) with a partner half her age. But it is less the sexual relationship aspect that throws Fiona into a crisis than a sense of lost fulfillment of another soul to care for (a lack of a child of their own to bind her and her husband together?) that she sees in the young man. Her equivalent to an extra-marital affair being the highly unorthodox visit to Adam's bedside earlier in the film.

She has been forcing her lost sheep in both spheres of her life to depart from her without ever really understanding what made their lives tick. What they stood for, or why they had certain lines of behaviour that were too much for them to bear. She is always operating at a bit of a remove from direct feeling, understanding dilemmas perfectly well intellectually but not the emotional irrationality that might override the obviously 'sensible' decision and cause people to make choices that will only cause them inevitable harm, and yet be happy with that. Which is how she is able to pass quick, severe and permanent judgments that permanently affect the lives of others and then quickly move on (there is a callousness to the empathy there that is perhaps because it is part of her work, as shown more clearly through the doctors doing the 'best' thing for the patient but really refusing to treat the patient as a individual, or even that they have capacity, at any point in the process). Has she destroyed lives for the better or destroyed any sense of stability that they once had, plunging them into a new world of uncertainty and lack (I am not entirely sure if this is intended but I wonder if this also ties into the Code Unknown-style theme of locked doors and private, exclusive functions for the elite showing that there is a rarified world that certain groups have access to, or can deny access from. That would apply as much to the strange rules of the Jehovah's Witnesses to the courtroom setting, to even locking one's adulterous husband out of the house and the invitation only piano recital soirée at the end). She did not allow a young man to live his own life and choose his own death (no matter how stupid) but killed the person he was and left him with nothing to compensate for that loss, especially no moral compass. Almost inevitably despite Fiona trying to 'change the timeline' for the young man and divert him into a new life with a future full of secular promise, without her love (the love of the High Court?) as a substitute he still somehow finds a way to die by his own choosing as soon as he possibly can.

It is not Fiona's fault (or really her responsibility) for failing to build a new world for Adam after taking his previous one away from him and for rejecting his deluded advances on her, but in the end she kind of did more harm than good to everyone involved in that situation despite doing all of the 'proper' things that she should have done. But in a way Adam's Donnie Darko-like sacrifice of willingly closing off his alternate parallel universe lives on in the way that he gives her a glimpse of an 'irrational' way of living that enables her to reconnect with her husband again by having gone through her own flight of fancy and period of destabilisation before ending up back in the same place all over again, painfully re-awakened to emotion at the last possible moment before disaster herself.

(EDIT: And I am being 'over familiar' in calling the judge by her name Fiona above instead of the way that Adam only addresses her by her official term "My Lady" because using that term is probably intentionally meant to underline how starry-eyed Adam is over her from the very beginning of the process swirling around him, perhaps overly impressed by name and rank than even the later obsession with the actual lady herself, and showing that whilst losing his faith he has really just shifted into a substitute for a 'Higher Power' to become overly obsessed with to guide him. And of course Adam never realises that she is not "My Lady", not to him or to us (or really even to her husband) because she is married to the law, which takes precedent over the wellbeing of anyone else, no matter how deferential they are)
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1107 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Nov 03, 2020 7:22 am

Pretty good next week. The film showing at 9 p.m. on BBC2 on Saturday 7th (which it turns out after Apostasy and Make Up on the last two Saturdays is part of a season of modern British films in association with the BFI, and which also features brief opening introductions to each of the films) is Perfect 10.

BBC4 is still continuing with the Play For Today season on Tuesday 10th at 10.50 p.m. with Don't Be Silly, a 1979 drama about domestic violence which is particularly interesting as it has not appeared on YouTube at all as yet and is not in that upcoming BFI set either. The other notable thing in the BBC4 schedules is that they are going to be showing the German Arte channel documentary Berlin 1945: Diary of a City in three parts at 10 p.m. between Monday 9th and Wednesday 11th.

Instead of the Indian film season, Channel 4 is premiering the French gay male prostitute drama Sauvage at 1.10 a.m. in the early hours of Wednesday 11th (that's probably the most surprising film of the week to have popped up in the schedules. Judging by the BBFC content description I would be surprised if Channel 4 shows it unedited!), and BBC1 is continuing its single-handed attempt at doing a 'post-Ghostbusters redemption of Paul Feig' thing by after screening the (surprisingly good) Love Life series going on to premiere A Simple Favor at 10.45 p.m. on Friday 13th.

But Film4 pretty easily win the week with Climax at 11.35 p.m. on Saturday 7th and Bacurau at 12.55 a.m. on Thursday 12th. They are also doing an Arnold Schwarzenegger season at the moment and have a surprisingly rare repeat of Last Action Hero at 9 p.m. on Saturday 7th, just before Climax, which I might try and catch since I have never seen that film in its proper widescreen aspect ratio before!

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1108 Post by jlnight » Sat Nov 07, 2020 10:51 am

Angelica (2017), Fri 13th Nov, London Live.
Goodbye Columbus, Fri 13th Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Tue 17th Nov.

The Exorcist III, Sat 14th Nov, Horror.
The Fourth Protocol, Sat 14th Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Wed 18th Nov.

Small Axe: Mangrove, Sun 15th Nov, BBC1.

Shoplifters, Mon 16th Nov, Film4.

The Black Stuff (Play For Today), Tue 17th Nov, BBC4.
Happy as Lazzaro (LFF 2018), late Tue 17th Nov, Channel 4.


Connery tribute:
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Sat 14th Nov, Film4.
Time Bandits, Robin and Marian and The Man Who Would be King, Sun 15th Nov, Film4.

Bojack Horseman (fourth series) has sneaked out late Sunday nights on DMAX.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1109 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Nov 11, 2020 4:37 am

On seeing Last Action Hero for the first time in a few years on Saturday evening it was fun to be reminded of Tom Noonan, who played the serial killer in Michael Mann's Manhunter, appearing as the rather more one dimensional serial killer in the film within a film here (even better when we get to the film premiere in the real world to see Noonan appearing as himself talking a lot about his serious minded method of getting into such a goofy character, and then for his agent to run into the film-world serial killer and quickly bustle him off, assuming that Tom's probably just gone much too far into his method acting and turned up at the black tie event in full costume and make up, making it seem like it is something that the real actor has done a few times before!) and I had completely forgotten about the way that this consciously dumb film has tons of British luvvie thespians in it, including Joan Plowright as an English teacher trying unsuccessfully to interest her class in Shakespeare by playing a clip from the Olivier Hamlet (top tip: never start out your excerpt to an already sceptical classroom of kids with a line that has the word "bosom" in it!) and Ian McKellen as Death after he steps out of the local repertory screening of The Seventh Seal to wander down 42nd Street!

That reminds me that I particularly like that the 'real world' of the film is the ultimate seedy version of New York where you will get assaulted immediately on opening your apartment door, and the heightened 'film within a film' is all set in the permanently sunny but anonymous streets of L.A. where you can have endless gun toting car chases and wanton explosions everywhere without anyone batting an eyelid! Maybe beyond 'real vs movie', this film is perhaps more about the clashing philosophies towards New York vs Los Angeles action cinema on film (and of course John McTiernan directed both the ultimate L.A. action film with Die Hard and after Last Action Hero did New York entirely in Die Hard With A Vengeance)

It was very funny just after Red Heat was shown on Film4 the night before to have Schwarzenegger's co-star from that film Jim Belushi turn up at the glitzy New York premiere here to make some cutting comments! (Poor Arnie seems rather downtrodden in his 'real world' guise here, being taken to task by wife Maria Shriver for constantly talking about his Planet Hollywood restaurants at every opportunity because of how crass and desperate it comes across as!) And it was amusing to see Schwarzenegger doing the 'no talking, just violence' version of Hamlet, which beat Tarantino to the punch by a couple of decades! I assume that it was also a pointed dig at Mel Gibson's version of Hamlet for Franco Zeffirelli a couple of years earlier, which I seem to remember got lambasted a bit for his star casting.
____

And I caught Sauvage too, which was fine though nothing too surprising in the annals of gay cinema. Its your usual tragic tale of a male prostitute, Leo, who has fallen in love with a co-worker. Unfortunately the co-worker is mostly 'gay for pay' and pragmatically closed off to such an extent that he does not kiss and eventually is going to leave the country with an older sugar daddy who he does not love but will give him a new life post-retirement from the streets. This sends our main character into a spiral of despair as he turns tricks that vary from tender (but with older men) to (mostly) violent and he begins to ail from a mysterious illness (which the film takes pains to underline is not HIV or AIDS, which at least is something!) before finding a sugar daddy of his own, who asks him to come to Canada with him. But at the last moment at the airport Leo suddenly leaves and (paralleling an earlier scene where a group of guys all hide in the leafy copse by the runway and watch the planes coming in to land whilst getting high) ends up lying in the woods by the airport looking up at the planes but seeming pale and unmoving as a corpse.

The film has an interesting attitude towards lonely older men being the majority of the customers, reduced to having to pay for sex because the clubs have no place for them to build relationships after a certain age. Set against the younger clients using and discarding the prostitutes for short term needs, but no more. Maybe that all plays into the 'live fast, die young' approach to life that Leo has, because compared to his more pragmatic unrequited love interest (in both a positive and negative way, because that character appears to lack any emotion or empathy at all and is just pure business) Leo appears to be a bit repulsed by his older clients still living with unfulfilled desires, suggesting a fear of becoming like them in the future and that there may be love to be found at all except through transactional contacts.

A couple of films came strongly to mind whilst watching, though they unfortunately make Sauvage seem all the more conventional in comparison: My Own Private Idaho and Varda's Vagabond. As in My Own Private Idaho the film is focused entirely on one character's subjective experience of unrequited love and a mysterious ailment that looks set to be his downfall. But My Own Private Idaho also has all of those Henry IV allusions going on within it as well. And whilst Sauvage has a bit of a similarity to Vagabond in the way that we see the journey of this character as he moves between different characters who respond aggressively or sympathetically but always ineffectually as Leo moves towards an inevitable, chosen, end in a ditch somewhere, there is a much more 'mythical figure versus documentary reportage' aspect to the Varda film compared to the rather straight ahead handling in Sauvage. Although I suppose that neither of those films had the main character forced to sit on a Nebuchadnezzar-sized butt plug as here, so I suppose you lose the Bard and gain internal bleeding from one film to the other!

But it was worth seeing and Félix Maritaud anchors that central role extremely well, even if this is probably the most conventional of all of the films he has been in around this period (Maritaud was in 120 bpm, Knife + Heart and post-Sauvage has appeared in Gaspar Noé's Lux Æterna).
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1110 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Nov 11, 2020 3:29 pm

Pretty good next week as well. jlnight has noted all of the main films but I'll add trailers:

The big film of the week is the premiere of Hirokazu Kore-ed'a's Shoplifters on Film4 at 11.10 p.m. on Monday 16th, immediately followed by Like Father, Like Son at 1.30 a.m. with I Wish showing at 12.45 a.m. on Wednesday 18th (BBC2 repeated Our Little Sister a couple of weeks ago as well)

Happy As Lazzaro is on Channel 4 at 2 a.m. in the early hours of Wednesday 18th.

Two premieres clash together on Saturday 14th with the Jennifer Lawrence starring Red Sparrow at 9 p.m. on Channel 4 and Journey's End at 9 p.m. on BBC2.

BBC4's Play For Today season continues with 1980 film The Black Stuff at 10 p.m. on Tuesday 17th, written by Alan Bleasdale and which was Bernard Hill's big breakthrough and led to the 1982 Boys From The Blackstuff TV series. (The Black Stuff was directed by Jim Goddard who unfortunately came a cropper in the mid-1980s when he was the director of the ill fated Madonna and Sean Penn starring Shanghai Surprise)

BBC1 has started the second series of His Dark Materials at 8 p.m. on Sunday nights and on Sunday 15th follows it up at 9 p.m. with the first film in Steve McQueen's Small Axe anthology series Mangrove.

And BBC4's Storyville series is continuing with Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris at 9 p.m. on Monday 16th which is an ABC produced documentary about the fire last year that was filmed by the two French filmmakers who are probably best known for making that film about the New York Fire Department that accidentally turned into an on the scene reportage piece about 9/11. Although it appears to be cut down to 90 minutes compared to the two hour ABC version.

But Primal is pretty much the best show on television right now, doing more in compact twenty minute chunky episodes with no dialogue than many shows do in two hours.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1111 Post by jlnight » Sat Nov 14, 2020 5:46 am

Emmanuelle in Soho, late Fri 20th Nov, London Live.

Under Suspicion (1991), Sat 21st Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Thu 26th Nov. Or...
Lynn + Lucy (LFF 2019), Sat 21st Nov, BBC2.

The Apartment, Sun 22nd Nov, BBC2.
Something to Live For, Sun 22nd Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Mon 23rd Nov. Or...
Amundsen, Sun 22nd Nov, BBC4.

School For Secrets, Tue 24th Nov, Talking Pictures.
Escape from DS-3, late Tue 24th Nov, Talking Pictures.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1112 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Nov 18, 2020 5:33 am

I would say it is relatively quiet next week but Channel 5 have thirteen Christmas-themed TV movie premieres next week with at least one new film showing every afternoon (and occasionally three as on Saturday 21st). It is not even December yet! I have to admit to being a little intrigued by "A Very Corgi Christmas" I suppose! Though they really should outlaw the incredibly overdone by this point plot element of "the Boss needs for me to come to the big city to work over Christmas which I ordinarily would not have minded but has suddenly thrown me into a crisis now that I have fallen in love and rediscovered my heart", and these really are the kind of films that need a Lars von Trier film to immediately follow them as a kind of antidote to all of the sweetness! (EDIT: It turns out that "Our Christmas Love Song" stars Alicia Witt!)

Lynn + Lucy is the latest in contemporary British cinema that BBC2 is showing in collaboration with the BFI at 10.55 p.m. on Saturday 21st (It is also about to come out on Blu-ray and DVD).

BBC4's 'world television' strand is continuing with the first two episodes of Icelandic crime series The Valhalla Murders at 9 p.m. on Saturday 21st. BBC4 also has the other big film of the week with Amundsen at 10 p.m. on Sunday 22nd. And BBC4's Storyville series continues with The Mystery of D.B. Cooper at 9 p.m. on Monday 23rd. Will it be half as entertaining (or contain as much walking) as David DeCoteau's Bigfoot vs D.B. Cooper? Or feature as many shirtless twinks? (Per our discussion a little further back in thread about Eric Roberts having so many credits to his name if they are all like Bigfoot vs D.B. Cooper, where he does a few lines of voiceover narration and then gets credited as the main actor, I think I can see how he can amass so many roles in just a few years!)

BBC1 is showing the second of Steve McQueen's Small Axe series Lover's Rock at 9 p.m. on Sunday 22nd. Probably the most interesting thing next week is that BBC1 is also showing the first two episodes of Luca Guadagnino's TV series We Are Who We Are at 10.45 p.m. on Tuesday 24th. And at 10 p.m. on BBC4 there is an episode of Life Cinematic talking to Sofia Coppola about films that have influenced her, including [Safe] and Fish Tank, with a repeat of Fish Tank following at 11 p.m.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Sun Nov 22, 2020 12:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jlnight
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1113 Post by jlnight » Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:51 am

The Quiller Memorandum, Sat 28th Nov, Talking Pictures. Also Wed 2nd Dec.
Monsoon (LFF 2019), Sat 28th Nov, BBC2. Or...
Death Trench, Sat 28th Nov, London Live.
Westworld (1973), late Sat 28th Nov, BBC1.

Fort Ti, Sun 29th Nov, Sony Movies Action.
Studio 54 (2018), Sun 29th Nov, Sky Arts. Or...
Balloon (2018), Sun 29th Nov, BBC4.

Ema, late Tue 1st Dec, Film4.

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1114 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:39 am

jlnight has noted the most interesting films of the week (I wonder if this is going to be Westworld's full aspect ratio television screening? BBC1 is also showing the Ralph Fiennes version of Coriolanus at 12.50 a.m. in the early hours of Monday 30th) but there are a few other things too:

Channel 5 ups the ante on Christmas themed TV movie premieres every afternoon from thirteen to sixteen(!!!) The titles that stick out the most are Pride, Prejudice & Mistletoe (which is such a torturous failure of a pun that it sticks in the memory! The less said about the groan-worthy "We Wish You A Marry Christmas" the better! Which is also known as "Marrying Father Christmas", which comes from the same director as "Sense, Sensibility & Snowmen" ](*,) ), and "Another Christmas Coincidence" which I just imagine being intoned in an exasperated eye-rolling tone accompanied with a smirking shrug to camera. So Channel 5 are single handedly trying to make Christmas a thing this year, the rest of 2020 be damned! (Christmas At The Plaza might be interesting, apparently with a bit of subtitled French and directed by Ron Oliver, whose first film was Prom Night III!)

Lest you think that Channel 5 has blown all of its film money on the equivalent of the bauble budget for one scene of your average Hallmark Christmas movie they also do a bi-polar swing into premiering Eli Roth's remake of Death Wish at 10 p.m. on Monday 30th (which the RadioTimes is billing as "Bruce Willis' Death Wish". They also note that it is 15 rated, so it appears that it is not going to be the 18 rated version of the film that was released on Blu-ray) and Jack Reacher at 10 p.m. on Wednesday 2nd (which is similarly weird to Channel 4 showing the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2016 sequel before the 2014 film a few months back, as Jack Reacher: Never Look Back has been shown on Film4 a number of times already whilst this is the first showing for the original film! Though it is a slightly more understandable situation in this case than with the Turtles situation as at least here different channels appear to have had the rights to different entries in the series, so Film4 jumped the gun on the sequel while it was available to them!)

Monsoon is showing in BBC2's New British Film season at 10 p.m. on Saturday 28th. Balloon is on BBC4 at 10 p.m. on Sunday 29th (which I don't want to be cynical about but seems as if it has missed the wave of Hedwig and the Angry Inch/Good Bye Lenin/The Lives of Others films about East Germany that occurred in the mid 2000s by over a decade). And probably the most interesting film of the week is Ema, on Film4 at 1.20 a.m. on Wednesday 2nd.

The third of the Small Axe series has John Boyega in Red, White and Blue at 9 p.m. on Sunday 29th.

And tucked away on ITV2 at 1.45 p.m. on Sunday 29th is the premiere of The Lego Ninjago Movie.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Wed Dec 02, 2020 2:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

jlnight
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:49 am

Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1115 Post by jlnight » Sat Nov 28, 2020 3:33 pm

The Mouse on the Moon, Fri 4th Dec, Sony Movies Action.
Our Man in Marrakesh, Fri 4th Dec, Talking Pictures.

Dirty God, Sat 5th Dec, BBC2.
Beast From Haunted Cave, late Sat 5th Dec, Talking Pictures.

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Sun 6th Dec, Sony Movies Action.
Flame in The Streets, Sun 6th Dec, Talking Pictures. Or...
One Man and His Shoes (LFF 2020), Sun 6th Dec, BBC2. Or...
The Workshop (2017), Sun 6th Dec, BBC4.

Lean on Pete, Mon 7th Dec, Film4.

Affair in Trinidad, Tue 8th Dec, Sony Movies Action.

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1116 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 4:26 am

jlnight has noted the most interesting films of next week, but I'll add some trailers:

The BBC/BFI "New British Film" season continues with acid attack drama Dirty God at 10 p.m. on BBC2 on Saturday 5th (or later since the snooker is showing just beforehand)

The most exciting film of the week is Lauren Cantet's The Workshop at 10.10 p.m. on BBC4 on Sunday 6th. BBC4's Storyville season continues with Red Penguins: Murder, Money and Ice Hockey at 10 p.m. on Monday 7th.

Andrew Haigh's Lean On Pete is on Film4 at 11.15 p.m. on Monday 7th, and Colin Firth unwisely follows in Robert Redford's footsteps by trying to take a relaxing sailing trip to get away from his family in The Mercy which is on BBC2 at 9 p.m. on Friday 11th.

The Small Axe season continues with Alex Wheatle on BBC1 at 9 p.m. on Sunday 6th. After Primal reaches its climax this week, E4's Adult Swim slot is showing the latest series of Robot Chicken in the 1.40 a.m. slot from Friday 11th.

Channel 4 enter the intensely socio-political fray of the week's films with... um... Peter Rabbit at 5.10 p.m. on Sunday 6th. I suppose it is all about the proletariat uprising against the farmer, or something like that?

Channel 5's Christmas TV movie deluge slows slightly but there are still eleven premieres next week, including a film by David DeCoteau (The punningly titled Carole's Christmas, with nary a shirtless twink in sight!) and Sam Irvin (Christmas Made To Order). The relatively novel setting of Christmas In Vienna (though apparently actually filmed in Romania, which kind of begs the question of why not extol the virtues of Romania instead?) might make it one to watch, although it is from the director of Dudes & Dragons, so it may go in strange directions!
Last edited by colinr0380 on Sat Dec 05, 2020 9:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1117 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 2:08 am

Some of the BBC's Christmas schedule has been revealed and includes the Disney film premiere on Christmas Day afternoon of Coco (I see somebody at Pixar saw The Book of Life! Which I guess does not matter now that Fox is part of Disney), and Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk is on Boxing Day evening. BBC1 is also going to be premiering Spider-Man: Homecoming and the Aardman film Early Man too.

Plus the BBC is apparently doing a dark and gritty, on location new version of Black Narcissus for TV, which can only end well 8-[

jlnight
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#1118 Post by jlnight » Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:19 pm

It's a Wonderful Life, Sat 12th Dec, Film4.
Gold (1974), Sat 12th Dec, Talking Pictures. Also Wed 16th Dec. Or...
The Untouchables, Sat 12th Dec, BBC2. Or...
The Shape of Water, Sat 12th Dec, Channel 4.
The Hill, Sat 12th Dec, BBC2.

The Godfather, Sun 13th Dec, BBC2.

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