The Films of 2019

Discussions of specific films and franchises.
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DarkImbecile
Ask me about my visible cat breasts
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 6:24 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM

Re: The Films of 2019

#76 Post by DarkImbecile » Tue Jan 14, 2020 1:29 pm

I was going to only post the top ten, then wanted to make sure to include some A Hidden Life propaganda and expanded it to twenty, then saw where La Flor was and figured you’d appreciate a top 25.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: The Films of 2019

#77 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:03 pm

Image

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: The Films of 2019

#78 Post by knives » Sat Jan 18, 2020 8:28 pm

Are non-mods not able to make threads in this sub-forum any longer?

Anyway this post is about Ready or Not, a film that managed to punch all of my buttons in the right way to right degree. I even rewatched it a few days later because I couldn't believe it was as good as I initially thought. Turns out I was right, but in the wrong direction. This quiet little horror comedy built on sickly irony after sickly irony is built for me to spill hyperbole on. So instead of an easily forgotten modern horror flick for our list like I was expecting you have the option to read my crazy ramblings. It's probably telling how deeply Blumhouse has invaded the horror genre that I was shocked this wasn't an example.

The main theme seems simple enough. Climbing up the social ladder is basically impossible and even through the fastest way of accomplishment, sex, the personal cost is basically too much. That same insularity is a form of death for the rich though through fucked-upitude. It's probably no surprise that the zealot of the family is also the one who has suffered the greatest tragedy. In all the bizzare comedy Radio Silence has managed to present the most complex take on the 1% in cinema so far. It highlights how there are rules to American society on how to properly go from poor to rich and not following those rules is seen like a deadly virus to the social circles (because society is more important than money) going to eradicate them. A character claims children don't deserve the plague a bad match will bring down, but the children come in at right that moment to remind us how acculturation brings that guilt early.

So much of that has to do with the performances which are amazing. If Samara Weaving and her jazz hands don't win an oscar some day a grave crime has been committed on a cosmic level. This is a tonally complex piece and she carries us through the drama and comedy with a tired frustration that perfectly encapsulates everything the movie wants and needs.

On the rewatch the film also provided a lot of nice details that become more hilarious and meaningful. For example the opening sequence (it was the '80s) highlights perfectly Alex's and Daniel's character that everything about them feels like it spills out from there. The moral care of the film also becomes more stark. There's essentially two fates characters can meet here. Both are unpleasant, but one has a statement you are evil attached to it and the other could happen to anyone. It's clear from first blush why one character meets the later end, but a second does as well. The reasons for that have to do with how the characters are connected to each other. The female characters are largely comments on Grace and the men on Alex. This is incredibly blatant when Daniel draws a connection between the biography of his wife and Grace. The difference between the two is how they have reacted to their circumstances in the face of the economic hierarchy. Grace has learned the value of community and that is what she prizes in this family over their wealth while the wife does not to say the least. The best part about this is how it is not hovered over, but introduced clearly enough to allow it to marinate the rest of the film.

The most potent of these pairings is with Andie MacDowell's matriarch. By the sick mind of the family this is the ideal way to climb the social ladder. She likewise seems like a good person being empathetic to Grace and the needs of her family (as well as being the only character is not a complete blue blooded idiot). She's adjusted to wealth be being feminine and caring. We don't see her engaging in masculine acts like Grace's smoking. She's alright and deserves our sympathy even as she is also incredibly evil (as shown in the opening scene). MacDowell provides the complex note of why things feel normal for these people.

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domino harvey
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: The Films of 2019

#79 Post by domino harvey » Sat Jan 18, 2020 8:41 pm

Nope. Mods split off indiv discussion if needed from threads like these, been that way for a while

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: The Films of 2019

#80 Post by knives » Sat Jan 18, 2020 8:48 pm

domino harvey wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 8:41 pm
Nope. Mods split off indiv discussion if needed from threads like these, been that way for a while
Guess it shows how long I've been passionate enough about a movie to even try.

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