Kino

Milestone, Flicker Alley, Oscilloscope, Cinema Guild...they're all here.
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Ribs
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:14 pm

Re: Kino

#3076 Post by Ribs » Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:55 pm

Wording confused me there, as your post implied to me it would be a UHD!

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FrauBlucher
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Re: Kino

#3077 Post by FrauBlucher » Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:25 am

Ribs wrote:



Wording confused me there, as your post implied to me it would be a UHD!
A 4k restoration upgrade of Tarkovsky's The Sacrifice will be released May 15

double fixed

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Drucker
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Re: Kino

#3078 Post by Drucker » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:52 pm


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Big Ben
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Re: Kino

#3079 Post by Big Ben » Wed Feb 28, 2018 4:14 pm

I really liked most of A Touch of Zen. But then it just sort of changed into something else near the 3/4 mark. I'm going to assume someone here has seen this. Is this similar?

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knives
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Re: Kino

#3080 Post by knives » Wed Feb 28, 2018 4:17 pm

If this is Rain in the Mountain also know as A Touch of Zen 2 then I would be willing to argue it as a better and more philosophical film. Probably the greatest cinematic treatment of Buddhism I have ever seen.

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The Fanciful Norwegian
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Re: Kino

#3081 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Wed Feb 28, 2018 5:37 pm

Raining in the Mountain is a different film shot around the same time. Legend is a more discursive movie with less action and a ghost story that Hu actually follows through on (unlike A Touch of Zen where he used it as a jumping-off point for something very different). There's still a Buddhist aspect but it feels more elemental in a way.

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Big Ben
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Re: Kino

#3082 Post by Big Ben » Wed Feb 28, 2018 6:02 pm

The Fanciful Norwegian wrote:Raining in the Mountain is a different film shot around the same time. Legend is a more discursive movie with less action and a ghost story that Hu actually follows through on (unlike A Touch of Zen where he used it as a jumping-off point for something very different). There's still a Buddhist aspect but it feels more elemental in a way.
I'll definitely pick it up then. Thanks for the information.

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theflirtydozen
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2014 4:21 pm

Re: Kino

#3083 Post by theflirtydozen » Wed Mar 07, 2018 12:54 pm

Backers of the Kickstarter campaign for Pioneers: First Women filmmakers just received a video update. Very tentative release date set for late September/early October and is now 6 discs instead of 5!

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solaris72
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Re: Kino

#3084 Post by solaris72 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 10:22 pm

Extras for Kino's blu of the 4k restoration of Tarkovsky's The Sacrifice:
Kino wrote:DISC ONE:
BRAND NEW 4K RESTORATION OF THE FILM
Feature audio commentary by Layla Alexander-Garrett, Tarkovsky's translator on the set of The Sacrifice
Original Trailer
DISC TWO:
Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky - a documentary on the making of The Sacrifice (102 minutes)
Interview with Michal Leszczylowski, editor of The Sacrifice and director of Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky (32 minutes)
An illustrated booklet with excerpts from Tarkovsky's diaries and an essay by film scholar Robert Bird
The translator commentary sounds really interesting.

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Luke M
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Re: Kino

#3085 Post by Luke M » Sat May 05, 2018 11:47 pm


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jsteffe
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Re: Kino

#3086 Post by jsteffe » Wed May 09, 2018 11:22 pm

According to DVD Beaver, the new Kino Blu-ray from the 4k restoration runs 2:26, whereas the Artificial Eye Blu-ray runs 2:29. That seems like a significant discrepancy in the running time. If anyone ends up with both editions, I'd be interested to hear about the differences. Eventually my library will get the new Kino Blu-ray so I could do a comparison myself, but it wouldn't happen for another month or two.

dda1996a
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Re: Kino

#3087 Post by dda1996a » Thu May 10, 2018 2:45 am

PAL vs. NTSC? That's only three minutes which I'd bet indicate that speed up

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MichaelB
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Re: Kino

#3088 Post by MichaelB » Thu May 10, 2018 3:31 am

dda1996a wrote:PAL vs. NTSC? That's only three minutes which I'd bet indicate that speed up
That can’t be the answer, partly because PAL-NTSC isn’t an issue with Blu-ray, but also because a 149-minute theatrical feature would lose six and a half minutes rather than three in that situation.

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Lost Highway
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Re: Kino

#3089 Post by Lost Highway » Thu May 10, 2018 6:00 am

I watched William Cameron Menzies 50s horror movie The Maze in 3D last night and thought it was great fun. The 3D is very strong and the movie itself is atmospheric, quirky and charming.

I’d long read about this film in books about horror films as a sort of minor classic but never managed to catch it. Praised for its atmosphere and ridiculed for its denouement, I sort of knew what lurks in the maze, so I wasn’t too thrown off by the end. Yes, when finally revealed the creature looks far from scary and the explanation is silly but the end is also oddly moving. Something that struck me about the film is that by the end it is revealed that everybody is motivated by basic decency, something rare in horror films. Everybody’s intention is to help or save somebody else and that ultimately is quite affecting.
SpoilerShow
When the frog lord of the castle has been discovered and hops away in panic and shame, he is more tragic than scary, in a long tradition of misunderstood monsters.
The movie points towards two horror classics to come, The Shining of course but also to Robert Wise’s The Haunting. The scenes of something stalking the corridors at night are effective and creepy and reminded me of that film. I liked the cast too, apart from Richard Carlson they weren’t familiar to me. Veronica Carlson and Katherine Emery are likeable heroines, determined to get to the bottom of the mystery (though they still are required to scream and faint when coming across something scary)

While the film has obvious budgetary limitations (the various rooms of the castle appear to be the same few walls of a movie set moved around) William Cameron Menzies always keeps things visually engaging. He really knows how to use 3D without resorting to things flying at the camera (not counting a few typically stiff, period horror-movie bats). This film itself mostly looks pin sharp.

I’ll be sad when there will be no more 3D on blu-ray, especially for classic 3D releases like this. These 50s 3D movies are a revelation when having been converted from their anaglyph versions to modern 3D. They never have been seen like this.
Last edited by Lost Highway on Thu May 10, 2018 6:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

dda1996a
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Re: Kino

#3090 Post by dda1996a » Thu May 10, 2018 6:12 am

MichaelB wrote:
dda1996a wrote:PAL vs. NTSC? That's only three minutes which I'd bet indicate that speed up
That can’t be the answer, partly because PAL-NTSC isn’t an issue with Blu-ray, but also because a 149-minute theatrical feature would lose six and a half minutes rather than three in that situation.
I stand corrected then. I thought there were still blu-ray that differ in regions because of speed-up

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MichaelB
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Re: Kino

#3091 Post by MichaelB » Thu May 10, 2018 6:21 am

dda1996a wrote:I stand corrected then. I thought there were still blu-ray that differ in regions because of speed-up
I suspect you're thinking of issues where films shot for European television at 25fps (Dekalog, Berlin Alexanderplatz, the TV work of Alan Clarke and Ken Russell) have to be slowed down to 24fps to comply with the more restricted US Blu-ray specs. But that wouldn't apply to a film that's always been a 24fps theatrical feature.

I'm bemused by this running-time difference, because there's no question that the film originally played theatrically at 149 minutes. I'd understand if a new restoration was slightly longer, because of additional credits to do with the restoration, but unless DVD Beaver is misreporting the running time, it looks as though this is actually missing some footage.

(Although I wasn't particularly attracted to this version anyway - I saw the film numerous times in 35mm, and my memory of the colours suggests that the Artificial Eye disc is far more accurate.)

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tenia
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Re: Kino

#3092 Post by tenia » Thu May 10, 2018 7:25 am

While there seems to be a clear upgrade in texture, the caps I've seen gave me some doubts about the grading. IIRC, it's not the only Tarkvoski restoration like this.

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Roger Ryan
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Re: Kino

#3093 Post by Roger Ryan » Thu May 10, 2018 12:39 pm

tenia wrote:While there seems to be a clear upgrade in texture, the caps I've seen gave me some doubts about the grading. IIRC, it's not the only Tarkvoski restoration like this.
I'm not pleased that the change in contrast has wiped out all of the cloud texture in the opening scene.

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bugsy_pal
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Re: Kino

#3094 Post by bugsy_pal » Thu May 10, 2018 7:58 pm

Roger Ryan wrote:
tenia wrote:While there seems to be a clear upgrade in texture, the caps I've seen gave me some doubts about the grading. IIRC, it's not the only Tarkvoski restoration like this.
I'm not pleased that the change in contrast has wiped out all of the cloud texture in the opening scene.
Yes, my heart sank when I saw the screencaps. I have the old Kino bluray and the Artificial Eye, and I'll stick with the latter. The old Kino bluray was bad - terrible encoding. This new Kino disc looks overly contrast-boosted to me (even though I've never seen it on film anywhere).

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Bob Furmanek
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2008 9:59 am

Re: Kino

#3095 Post by Bob Furmanek » Fri May 11, 2018 11:49 am

Lost Highway wrote:
I’ll be sad when there will be no more 3D on blu-ray, especially for classic 3D releases like this. These 50s 3D movies are a revelation when having been converted from their anaglyph versions to modern 3D. They never have been seen like this.
Thanks for the great review, I'm glad that you enjoyed it.

THE MAZE restoration is our first collaboration with Martin Scorsese and the Film Foundation: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/the-maze

Polarized 3-D was first shown publicly in 1936. None of the 1950's 3-D features were anaglyphic originally, they were all shown in high quality, discrete polarized 3-D. A handful were converted to red/cyan anaglyphic in the 1970's and 80's. See myth number one for more information: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths

Our next restoration is SANGAREE: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/sangaree

Bob Furmanek
3-D Film Archive

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Lost Highway
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Re: Kino

#3096 Post by Lost Highway » Fri May 11, 2018 12:20 pm

Bob Furmanek wrote:
Lost Highway wrote:
I’ll be sad when there will be no more 3D on blu-ray, especially for classic 3D releases like this. These 50s 3D movies are a revelation when having been converted from their anaglyph versions to modern 3D. They never have been seen like this.
Thanks for the great review, I'm glad that you enjoyed it.

THE MAZE restoration is our first collaboration with Martin Scorsese and the Film Foundation: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/the-maze

Polarized 3-D was first shown publicly in 1936. None of the 1950's 3-D features were anaglyphic originally, they were all shown in high quality, discrete polarized 3-D. A handful were converted to red/cyan anaglyphic in the 1970's and 80's. See myth number one for more information: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths

Our next restoration is SANGAREE: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/sangaree

Bob Furmanek
3-D Film Archive
A repertory cinema I used to go to a lot in the late 70s/early 80s had a retrospective of 3D movies. I remember that the B&W 50s movies I saw (Creature from the Black Lagoon and It Came from Outer Space) were shown anaglyphic while the one color film I saw, Flesh for Frankenstein was shown polarized. I don't pretend to be an expert on 3D but that's what my experience was, so they must have been converted.

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Bob Furmanek
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Re: Kino

#3097 Post by Bob Furmanek » Fri May 11, 2018 1:40 pm

Some films (Creature from the Black Lagoon, It Came from Outer Space, The Maze, Robot Monster, Spooks, The Mad Magician) were converted to anaglyphic 3-D in the 1970's for re-issue. Others (Miss Sadie Thompson, Bwana Devil, Gorilla at Large, Revenge of the Creature, Hondo) were converted in the 1980's for television broadcast. All were originally shown theatrically in Polaroid 3-D.

KinoLorberRep
Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2018 5:12 pm

Re: Kino

#3098 Post by KinoLorberRep » Wed Jun 06, 2018 5:21 pm

MichaelB wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 6:21 am
dda1996a wrote:I stand corrected then. I thought there were still blu-ray that differ in regions because of speed-up
I suspect you're thinking of issues where films shot for European television at 25fps (Dekalog, Berlin Alexanderplatz, the TV work of Alan Clarke and Ken Russell) have to be slowed down to 24fps to comply with the more restricted US Blu-ray specs. But that wouldn't apply to a film that's always been a 24fps theatrical feature.

I'm bemused by this running-time difference, because there's no question that the film originally played theatrically at 149 minutes. I'd understand if a new restoration was slightly longer, because of additional credits to do with the restoration, but unless DVD Beaver is misreporting the running time, it looks as though this is actually missing some footage.

(Although I wasn't particularly attracted to this version anyway - I saw the film numerous times in 35mm, and my memory of the colours suggests that the Artificial Eye disc is far more accurate.)
Hi all - the running time discrepancy comes from a difference in the running time of the opening credits. The new 4K restoration comes from French material - and the French credits run 3 minutes shorter than the Swedish credits. No footage is missing.

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Timec
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Re: Kino

#3099 Post by Timec » Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:41 am

Kino will be releasing ten restored Hungarian films:
Variety wrote:Kino Lorber has announced that it has acquired North American rights for ten newly restored classics from the Hungarian National Film Fund- Film Archive.

The titles includes “Mephisto,” directed by István Szabó, which won the Best Foreign Language Film at the 1981 Academy Awards; “Colonel Redl,” directed by Szabó and a 1986 Academy Award nominee; Szabo’s “Confidence,” winner of the Silver Bear for Best Director at the 1980 Berlin International Film Festival and 1981 Academy Award nominee.

The others are “My 20th Century, directed by Ildikó Enyedi; and six films by Miklós Jancsó — “The Red and White,” “The Confrontation,” “Elektra, My Love,” “The Round-Up,” “Winter Wind” and “Red Psalm,”which won the Best Director award at 1972 Cannes Film Festival.
There's a lot of overlap with Second Run here, but I'll be happy to upgrade the Jancsó titles (assuming they're released on BD.)

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Ribs
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Re: Kino

#3100 Post by Ribs » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:18 pm

... this is HUGE! Fantastic, how wonderful! Great on Kino.

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