Tennessee Williams Film Collection

Discuss North American DVDs and Blu-rays or other DVD and Blu-ray-related topics.
Message
Author
User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#26 Post by Lino » Sat Dec 03, 2005 12:24 pm

This is a lazy Saturday so I went scouting for possible cover art for all the titles in the upcoming box.

A Streetcar named Desire

Image

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Image

Night of the Iguana

Image

Sweet Bird of Youth

Image

Baby Doll

Image

The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

Image


Warner tends to use original poster art for their DVD covers and that's perfectly OK and even commendable but of the above, I'm only keen on the Cat one, I'm afraid.

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#27 Post by Lino » Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:04 pm

I can't get this box out of my mind. I'm especially curious about the new SE of Cat - well overdue. Anyway, while browsing through another forum I found a justification for the non-inclusion of The Glass Menagerie:
Fox has ALL rights to THE GLASS MENAGERIE which was produced by one-time agent, later film-producer Charles K. Feldman at Warners, with full Warner input. The same with STREETCAR the following year.

Warner Bros. lost their distribution rights to both films after seven years, and Feldman later made a deal with Fox for both STREETCAR and GLASS MENAGERIE. Feldman took the rights back to STREETCAR when they lapsed, but Fox kept MENAGERIE. STREETCAR later traveled to United Artists, then Lorimar. When Feldman died he left the ownership of the film to the Motion Picture & Television Fund. Warners got STREETCAR "back home" with its purchase of Lorimar, but had to negotiate a new distribution deal with the MP&TF to continue distribution. As it is one of their crown jewels, I doubt they'll let it go again.
One other reason for personal rejoice is that I've only recently found out that Lotte Lenya is part of the cast of Roman Stone! You gotta luv Lotte!

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#28 Post by david hare » Sat Dec 03, 2005 5:30 pm

Not to mention Australian actress Coral Browne (wife of Vincent Price!) who late went on to play herself as the BBC dyke in the execrable Killing of Sister George.

Re Lilith, was thinking of the classical girl, but either Jean Seberg or Helen Walkerwould do.

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#29 Post by Lino » Sat Dec 03, 2005 5:44 pm

davidhare wrote: Re Lilith, was thinking of the classical girl, but either Jean Seberg or Helen Walkerwould do.
Jean Seberg for me, s'il vous plait! I love that girl!

http://www.saintjean.co.uk/portrait.htm

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#30 Post by david hare » Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:00 pm

Each time we go to Paris (now every year) I keep forgetting to visit her grave at Montparnasse. The area is frankly not what it used to be when she made A Bout de Souffle. BTW do you have the gorgeous Columbia DVD of Bonjour Tristesse?

I usually dp spend a day at Pere laChaise cemetery which is full of old friends, like Proust, Chopin, Wilde, and despite the tourists for Jim Morrisson is a great place for meditation... You have prompted me to pay my respects to Jean/Lilith next trip in June. Maybe we'll see you there! I'll be the one reading the NY Herald Tribune.

User avatar
kinjitsu
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 1:39 pm
Location: Uffa!

#31 Post by kinjitsu » Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:22 pm

davidhare wrote: I'll be the one reading the NY Herald Tribune.
That must be an old, musty paper by now!

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#32 Post by david hare » Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:40 pm

Believe it or not you could still buy the Trib in Paris up to the eighties. It was never much chop as a journal but Jean imbued it with her own magic, and one always bought it out of memory for her.

User avatar
kinjitsu
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 1:39 pm
Location: Uffa!

#33 Post by kinjitsu » Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:45 pm

davidhare wrote:Believe it or not you could still buy the Trib in Paris up to the eighties. It was never much chop as a journal but Jean imbued it with her own magic, and one always bought it out of memory for her.


Nowadays one can always make do with the International Herald Trib, but at a kiosk, not alas, from une belle fille sur la rue.

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#34 Post by david hare » Sat Dec 03, 2005 10:44 pm

But you can still see some of Jean's style in the coiff and demanor of many a jolie fille Parisienne. Would love to catch a retro of Bonjour Tristesse next visit!

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#35 Post by Lino » Sun Dec 04, 2005 7:06 am

davidhare wrote:BTW do you have the gorgeous Columbia DVD of Bonjour Tristesse?
Not yet! :oops: That's my very favorite film of hers (have watched it countless times) and although she is more hip in Breathless, this is the one that does it for me. Guess I have to order it now.

Love the Saul Bass opening credits, love the music, love her clothes, her hairdo, and to top that David Niven is her dad and Deborah Kerr his girlfriend! How cool is that? This is one for rainy afternoons, definitely!

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#36 Post by Lino » Sun Dec 04, 2005 8:46 am

Well, don't we live in fast times! Had to go out this morning to do some errands and entered a shop where I dutefully proceeded to buy both Suddenly Last Summer and Bonjour Tristesse for dirt cheap prices: 12,99 € for the former and 9,90€ for the latter! A steal, no less! And since this is a rainy afternoon now, guess that leaves me no excuse to pay Miss Seberg a visit.

Now over to the Tennessee Williams theme (this is his thread, after all). I feel very curious as to how I will feel when I rewatch Suddenly... again. The first time I saw it, I was very little and while the film certainly left a deep impression on me (hell, I literally remember certain vivid scenes as if I just watched them last night) many years have passed since then and now I am no longer someone who felt a little unaware at what that whole underlying thing around Monty's friends really was! Innocence lost, indeed.

Hmm...guess I'll email Mulvaney about Boom! now.

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#37 Post by david hare » Mon Dec 05, 2005 3:01 am

Yes Beatty's early carrer needs revisiting in all of these, especially Lilith, Roman Spring and the Penn. (In the latter Hurd Hatfiled - now an older male beauty of great skill and dignity -gives a fantastic performance, as he does in Left Handed Gun as the journalist in love with Billy/Paul Newman.)

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#38 Post by david hare » Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:26 pm

Welcome to OT Central. Mickey One is the nouvelle vague movie Penn had to make, and Bonny and Clyde is the nouvelle vague screenplay Penn had to shoot. I still like The Chase, but you are right to see it as teetering into ole' Southern Gothic. But that's Marlon's doing surely? (And you've got to love him playing raving queen against Nicholson of all people in Missouri Breaks.)

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#39 Post by david hare » Wed Dec 07, 2005 5:28 am

Annie think June 9 to 22 next year. I (we, but never mind that) will be in Paris then. I'll definitely be spending a morning or three at Bistrot Beaubourg, or Cafe Grizzly on Rue St Martin. Around 11 am chaque matin. Carrying a copy of Sebastian Venables is Dead (just to remind you of Suddenly, surely one of the most pre-censored and meaningless movies ever made, despite Joe Manciewicz.)

We are booking an apartment this week, so get your peepers on, kiddo.

(I'm trying to lure Devlinn there at the same time so we can do the Kay Thompson/Astaire routine "Clap Your hands" from Funny Face. It depends on who's taller. If Dev is he can do Kay. And you can do Fred. I suspect I'm the short arse in this equation.But I like to watch.)

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#40 Post by Lino » Wed Dec 07, 2005 6:15 am

That's a nice thing to look forward to. No promises. We'll see. Always wanted to visit Paris. Been to London and Berlin. Guess the french capital is next on the menu.

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#41 Post by david hare » Wed Dec 07, 2005 6:27 am

Tu parles Francais? That's "parles", not "do". (I do both personally. Soanyway, to quote Daria.) Damn! Where's that Monsieur Schrek?

It would be charming actually. But I have to warn you - the French/Parisians are ultimately agreable!

BTW how tall are you? I have to PM Devlinn.

User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#42 Post by Lino » Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:15 am

davidhare wrote:Tu parles Francais? That's "parles", not "do". (I do both personally. Soanyway, to quote Daria.) Damn! Where's that Monsieur Schrek? BTW how tall are you?
Bien sur, Monsieur! And german. And spanish. And a bit of italian. Oh, and portuguese too! Rendez-vous at the Soanyway River? I am 1m 70cm (you do the maths, here :wink: ), brown hair and eyes.

User avatar
david hare
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:01 pm
Location: WellyYeller

#43 Post by david hare » Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:08 pm

That makes me the short arse! No hair and brown eyes, probably already drunk at 11am. Warbling "How long has this been Going on?"

User avatar
devlinnn
Take a chance you stupid ho
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 3:23 am
Location: three miles from space

#44 Post by devlinnn » Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:58 pm

Sadly won't be thinkin' pink, clappin' my hands and bonjouring Paris 'till around 2008-9 the way things are at present. So Annie you will have to be Kay, and David, I'm sure the suede loafers fit - you are Fred Astaire. Until then my partner and I will have to continue our great On How to be Lovely whenever we find ourselves in aprons, working on our basal metabolism.

User avatar
Derek Estes
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 8:00 pm
Location: Portland Oregon

#45 Post by Derek Estes » Fri Dec 09, 2005 7:07 pm

From USA Today
One of America's greatest playwrights, Tennessee Williams, will be honored with a DVD box set arriving in stores April 11.

Warner Home Video's Tennessee Williams Film Collection ($80) includes two-disc special editions of the two most celebrated film adaptations of Williams' plays —Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and A Streetcar Named Desire— as well as four other films that have never before been available on DVD: Sweet Bird of Youth, Night of the Iguana, Baby Doll and The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone. Also included is the CBC documentary Tennessee Williams' South.

Warner's George Feltenstein says the films are remarkably faithful to Williams' original plays, given the era in which they were produced. "The only minor thing that inhibits them — and which is painful for us purists — is that certain censorship issues that existed when some of the earlier films were made affected the fidelity of the original plays," Feltenstein says.

"In the end of A Streetcar Named Desire, Stella goes back to Stanley despite the fact that he destroyed her sister, because her lust is just too strong. But in the movie, she says no, not ever. And of course the relationship between Skip and Brick in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is very skirted around because of the censors at the time."

Extras in the collection include new "making of" documentaries for each film, rare screen tests with stars Marlon Brando, Rip Torn and Geraldine Page, and a 1947 radio broadcast with Brando.


User avatar
Lino
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 6:18 am
Location: Sitting End
Contact:

#46 Post by Lino » Sun Dec 11, 2005 2:10 pm

This is shaping up to be a fantastic release all around! Bring it on, Warners!

User avatar
Jeff
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 9:49 pm
Location: Denver, CO

#47 Post by Jeff » Mon Dec 12, 2005 6:09 pm

Full specs from DVD Times. Let the squealing begin, Annie.

[quote]Warner Home Video have announced the Region 1 DVD release of The Tennessee Williams Film Collection for 11th April 2006. This eight-disc DVD set contains the acclaimed film adaptations of one of America's greatest playwrights. The collection, priced at $79.92 SRP, features the long-awaited DVD debuts of Sweet Bird of Youth, Night of the Iguana, Baby Doll and The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone along with a newly remastered two-disc Special Edition of A Streetcar Named Desire and single disc Deluxe Edition of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Also included is a bonus disc, the rarely seen feature-length documentary, Tennessee Williams' South. A Streetcar Named Desire is available for $26.99 SRP. All other individual titles are available for $19.97 SRP each.

Bonus materials in this collection include new making-of documentaries for each film, plus expert commentaries, never before seen outtakes, rare screen tests with Brando, Rip Torn and Geraldine Page, a radio broadcast with Brando from 1947 and vintage featurettes. Exclusive to the collection is a special bonus disc, Tennessee Williams' South, a feature-length vintage documentary that includes remarkable interviews with Williams in and around New Orleans, plus great scenes from Williams' plays especially filmed for this documentary, including rare footage of Jessica Tandy as Blanche (the role she created in A Streetcar Named Desire) and Maureen Stapleton as Amanda in The Glass Menagerie.

A Streetcar Named Desire: 2-Disc Special Edition is a celebration of what is, perhaps, Williams' greatest masterpiece. This edition features three minutes of footage that was deleted from the final release version (and thought lost until its rediscovery in the early 1990s) that underscores, among other things, the sexual tension between Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh) and Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando), and Stella Kowalski's (Kim Hunter) passion for husband Stanley. The Legion of Decency required these scenes be cut in order for the film to be released.

A Streetcar Named Desire depicts a culture clash between Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh), a pretentious, fading relic of the Old South, and Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando), a rising member of the industrial, inner-city immigrant class. Blanche is a Southern belle whose pretensions to virtue and culture only thinly mask her nymphomania and alcoholism. Arriving at the house of her sister Stella Kowalski (Kim Hunter), Stella fears Blanche's arrival will upset the balance of her relationship with her husband Stanley, a primal, rough-hewn, brutish and sensual force of nature. He dominates Stella in every way, and she tolerates his offensive crudeness and lack of gentility largely because of her sexual need for him. Stanley's friend and Blanche's would-be suitor Mitch (Karl Malden) is similarly trampled along Blanche and Stanley's collision course. Their final, inevitable confrontation results in Blanche's mental annihilation.

The film won Academy Awards? for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Karl Malden), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Vivien Leigh) , Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Kim Hunter), and Best Art Direction -- Set Decoration, Black-and-White. It was also nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Marlon Brando), Best Cinematography, Black-and-White, Best Costume Design, Black-and-White, Best Director, Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture, Best Picture, Best Sound Recording and Best Writing, Screenplay. In 1999 the film was selected by the United States Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Special Features Disc One:
Commentary by Karl Malden and film historian Rudy Behlmer
Elia Kazan movie trailer gallery
Subtitles: English, Français & Español (feature film only)

Special Features Disc Two:
Movie and audio outtakes
Marlon Brando screen test
Elia Kazan: A Director's Journey documentary
5 new insightful documentaries:
A Streetcar on Broadway
A Streetcar in Hollywood
Desire and Censorship
North and the South
An Actor Named Brando

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof: Remastered Deluxe Edition - The raw emotions and crackling dialogue of Tennessee Williams' 1955 Pulitzer Prize play rumble like a thunderstorm in this film version whose fiery performances and grown-up themes made it one of 1958's top box-office hits.

Paul Newman earned his first Oscar? nomination as troubled ex-sports hero Brick. In a performance that marked a transition to richer adult roles, Elizabeth Taylor snagged her second. The film was nominated for six Academy Awards including Best Picture. Also starring Burl Ives (repeating his Broadway triumph as mendacity-loathing Big Daddy), Judith Anderson and Jack Carson, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof sizzles.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is the story of a Southern family in crisis, focusing on the turbulent relationship between Maggie the Cat (Elizabeth Taylor) and Brick (Paul Newman), and their interaction with Brick's family over the course of a weekend gathering at the family estate. Brick, an aging football hero, has neglected his wife and further infuriates her by ignoring his brother's attempts to gain control of the family fortune. Although Big Daddy (Burl Ives) has cancer and will not celebrate another birthday, his doctors and his family have conspired to keep this information from him and his wife. His relatives are in attendance and attempt to present themselves in the best possible light, hoping to receive the definitive share of Big Daddy's enormous wealth.

Oscar nominations were for Best Picture, Best Screenplay, Best Actor (Newman); Best Actress (Taylor), Best Director (Richard Brooks) and Best Cinematography.

Special Features:
Commentary by biographer Donald Spoto, author of The Kindness of Strangers: The Life of Tennessee Williams
New featurette Cat on a Hot Tin Roof: Somebody Up There Likes Him
Theatrical trailer
Languages: English & Français
Subtitles: English, Français & Español (feature film only)

Sweet Bird of Youth - Paul Newman, Geraldine Page, Rip Torn, Madeleine Sherwood and Ed Begley recreated their stage roles in this bravura film version which featured Shirley Knight. Begley won Best Supporting Oscar and Page and Knight were nominated. Sex, money, hypocrisy, financial and emotional blackmail are familiar elements in Williams' literary realm and combine powerfully in Sweet Bird of Youth as Chance (Newman) battles his private demons in a desperate bid to redeem his wasted life and recapture his lost sweet bird of youth.

Handsome Chance Wayne (Newman) never found the Hollywood stardom he craved, but he's always been a star with the ladies. Now, back in his sleepy, sweaty Gulf Coast hometown, he's involved with two of them: a washed-up, drug-and-vodka-addled movie queen. And the girl he left behind…and in trouble.

Special Features:
New featurette Sweet Bird of Youth: Broken Dreams and Damaged People
Never-before-seen Geraldine Page and Rip Torn screen test
Theatrical trailer
Languages: English & Français
Subtitles: English, Français & Español (feature film only)

Night of the Iguana - With an outstanding cast headed by Richard Burton, Ava Gardner and Deborah Kerr, direction by legendary John Huston and a steamy screenplay, Night of the Iguana pulses with conflicting passions and a surprising edge of knowing humor. Winner of one Academy Award and nominated for three more, the film explores the dark night of one man's soul – and illuminates the difference between dreams and the bittersweet surrender to reality.

In a remote Mexican seacoast town, a defrocked Episcopal priest (Richard Burton), ruined by alcoholism and insanity, struggles to pull his shattered life together. And the three women in his life – an earthy hotel owner (Ava Gardner), an ethereal artist (Deborah Kerr) and a hot-eyed, willful teenager (Sue Lyons) – can help save him. Or destroy him.

Shot just south of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, the tension-filled shoot put that small city on the map. Due in no small part to the presence of non-cast member Elizabeth Taylor, the shooting of the film during 1963 attracted large numbers of paparazzi, made international headlines, and in turn made Puerto Vallarta world-famous.

Special Features:
Commentary by John Huston
New featurette The Night of the Iguana: Dangerous Creatures
Vintage featurette On the Trail of the Iguana
1964 premiere highlights
Theatrical trailers
Languages: English & Français
Subtitles: English, Français & Español (feature film only)

Baby Doll - With Baby Doll, as with A Streetcar Named Desire, director Elia Kazan and writer Tennessee Williams broke new ground in depicting sexual situations – incorporating themes of lust, sexual repression, seduction, and the corruption of the human soul.
Time magazine called the film “just possibly the dirtiest American-made motion picture that has ever been legally exhibited.â€

User avatar
hamsterburger
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 11:12 am
Location: Norway
Contact:

#48 Post by hamsterburger » Mon Dec 12, 2005 7:16 pm

davidhare wrote: I keep forgetting to visit her grave at Montparnasse. The area is frankly not what it used to be when she made A Bout de Souffle.
Montparnasse, yeah, that's where all the cool dead celebs in Paris hang out. I took the tour with the other tourists two years ago and paid my respect to Jim and Oscar. Must go again some time and check it out. I'm such a fucking ghoul.

Good news about Streetcar. Mmm.. I saw it for the first time this fall when the cinemateque I work at screened it in a series about “male desireâ€

User avatar
devlinnn
Take a chance you stupid ho
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 3:23 am
Location: three miles from space

#49 Post by devlinnn » Mon Dec 12, 2005 7:52 pm

Wonderful to note the absence of a Richard Schickel commentary from this set, especially Streetcar.

Solaris
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2005 3:25 am
Location: Australia

#50 Post by Solaris » Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:57 pm

Night of the Iguana has commentary by John Huston??
Shall be interesting.........

Post Reply