German Filmmuseum Edition

Milestone, Flicker Alley, Oscilloscope, Cinema Guild...they're all here.
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McCrutchy
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 4:57 am
Location: East Coast, USA

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#651 Post by McCrutchy » Thu Apr 19, 2018 8:53 pm

denti alligator wrote:
Tommaso wrote:Now available: the 2-disc release of Ophuls' "Liebelei" and "Lola Montez". And "Lola" finally is the German-language version! If that alone wasn't reason to rejoice: the extras look spectacular.
Well, yet another DVD order is necessary. Wish they would do Blu-ray!
Agreed. I know they generally release obscure films, but bid be shocked if HD/2K masters aren't approaching bog standard even for most of them by now. More and more of EF's counterparts in other countries have made the transition to Blu-ray at least to some extent, but EF remain stuck on DVDs even though they are situated right in Europe's largest Blu-ray market, and more than one of their recent (in relative terms) film releases has a Blu-ray edition made available elsewhere. Unless the elements are in particularly poor condition, this particular Ophüls release would have seemed an ideal candidate for Blu-ray. I'll still probably get the DVD once it goes to general distribution through Alive in a few months, but I'd have gladly paid double the EF price and bought direct for a 2xBD-50 set with the same content.

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Tommaso
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 10:09 am

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#652 Post by Tommaso » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:24 am

Out of the blue, a new release:

Leuchtturm des Chaos & Der Havarist
by Wolf-Eckardt Bühler (1983/84).

Never even heard of them.

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Roger Ryan
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:04 pm
Location: A Midland town spread and darkened into a city

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#653 Post by Roger Ryan » Thu Aug 02, 2018 8:05 am

Pharos of Chaos was included as an extra on Criterion's release of The Asphalt Jungle.

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4LOM
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:10 pm
Location: Rheda-Wiedenbrueck / Germany
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Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#654 Post by 4LOM » Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:25 pm

McCrutchy wrote:Unless the elements are in particularly poor condition, this particular Ophüls release would have seemed an ideal candidate for Blu-ray. I'll still probably get the DVD once it goes to general distribution through Alive in a few months, but I'd have gladly paid double the EF price and bought direct for a 2xBD-50 set with the same content.
The reconstruction of the German premiere version of Lola Montez was done in Full HD back in 2001/2002. It was the first complete digital film restoration in Germany.

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neilist
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 5:09 am
Location: Cambridge, UK

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#655 Post by neilist » Thu Aug 30, 2018 4:54 pm

A couple of August 2018 new releases...
'Tender are the Feet' (Maung Wunna, 1972, Burma)

Sein Lin, a drummer of a traditional Burmese theatre group, falls in love with the beautiful dancer, Khin San. When she leaves the theatre to pursue a career as a film actress, he gives her a small figure as a keepsake, a symbol of traditional theatre. They part ways and he watches her from a distance as she appears to lose her way in the ultra-glamourous world of commercial cinema. This black and white classic comes with an important message: true art is as private and as intense as the love between a drummer and his dancer. Based on meticulous research of Burmese travelling theatre groups, Tender are the Feet was made in 1972. It is one of the first films of Maung Wunna, a director who developed his artistic style during the golden age of Burmese cinema and continued to do so despite the oppressive policies of the military dic tatorship. An important reference point for contemporary filmmakers, it has now been restored from the only sur - viving source material, a DVCPro archive tape provided by Myanmar's national broadcaster MRTV.
'Das Luftschiff' (Rainer Simon, 1983, East Germany) & 'Unbändiges Spanien' (Kurt & Jeanne Stern, 1962, East Germany)

Rainer Simon's adaptation of Fritz Rudolf Fries' novel "The Airship" is one of the most unconventional feature films ever produced in East Germany. Featuring a complex flashback structure and animated dream sequences painted directly on the film by artist Lutz Dammbeck, Das Luftschiff tells the story of an inventor who dreams of building a revolutionary new airship. When Civil War breaks out in Spain, the inventor refuses to allow his work to be abused for sinister political purposes.

Unbändiges Spanien is an expanded version of Spanish Earth by Joris Ivens, who authorized Jeanne and Kurt Stern to update his work for a new audience.

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L.A.
Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 7:33 am
Location: Helsinki, Finland

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#656 Post by L.A. » Tue Sep 25, 2018 6:52 am


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Saturnome
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:22 pm

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#657 Post by Saturnome » Tue Sep 25, 2018 3:07 pm

1936 must certainly be the last year of silent cinema. Is there any literature about silents in the 1930s outside of Japan?

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The Fanciful Norwegian
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 2:24 pm
Location: Teegeeack

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#658 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:09 pm

Most of the frequently-discussed Chinese films of the '30s were silent (including all of Ruan Lingyu's films). Best as I can tell, the last year for Chinese silents was 1935. So books dealing with '30s cinema in China, like Vivian Shen's The Origins of Left-wing Cinema in China, will be largely discussing silent films, though without discussing them as silent films per se.

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zedz
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:24 pm

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#659 Post by zedz » Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:18 pm

Korea's first sound film wasn't made until 1935 as well. The transition to sound in Asian national cinemas seems to be consistently later than in the West. India's first talkie was made in 1931, but I don't know how fast sound took over there.

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vertovfan
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 7:46 pm

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#660 Post by vertovfan » Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:35 am

The first Serbian sound feature film was made in 1942: Stevan Mišković and Dragoljub Aleksić's Innocence Unprotected. Dušan Makavejev paid homage to it in his 1968 film of the same name.

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Saturnome
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:22 pm

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#661 Post by Saturnome » Wed Sep 26, 2018 3:56 pm

But were silent serbian films made in 1940, 1941 ? I guess a late entry in the sound era is due to a few years without any filmmaking.

After my last post, I did a bit of research and found a few silent films from the Soviet Union and Japan from 1938 and 1939. I find the subject kind of fascinating, as a long time ago I was sure that the whole world was doing nothing but talkies by 1929. Any silents made later than 1931 is surprising to me (I'm, of course, not speaking of films like The Artist, I'm speaking of how far can you push further the "silent era"), and I'd love to find more examples outside of Japan,Russia and China.

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vertovfan
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 7:46 pm

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#662 Post by vertovfan » Wed Sep 26, 2018 4:34 pm

The Serbs definitely had a film industry prior to 1942 - enough to fill a 10-DVD set of “Film Pioneers” from Jugoslovenska Kinoteka. I’ve only just started going through it, but it contains both documentary and feature films, and 1942 is toward the tail end of the years covered. I found my copy on eBay, but unfortunately I haven’t run across any kind of official online description.

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The Fanciful Norwegian
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 2:24 pm
Location: Teegeeack

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#663 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Wed Sep 26, 2018 5:29 pm

zedz wrote:
Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:18 pm
Korea's first sound film wasn't made until 1935 as well. The transition to sound in Asian national cinemas seems to be consistently later than in the West. India's first talkie was made in 1931, but I don't know how fast sound took over there.
The slowness of Korea's transition to sound was likely a combination of lack of resources and the Japanese influence, specifically the popularity of live narrators (known as byeonsa, a borrowing of the Japanese benshi). India, however, transitioned to sound fairly quickly—figures from the Central Board of Film Certification cited in the Encylopaedia of Indian Cinema show that production of sound films outpaced that of silents by 1932, and production of silents stopped altogether by 1935. I'm not clear on why the uptake of sound was so much quicker in India than it was in China, since both shared the same issue of numerous mutually-unintelligible languages, but India's film industry appears to have been in better overall health than China's.

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whaleallright
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2005 12:56 am

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#664 Post by whaleallright » Fri Sep 28, 2018 4:49 pm

well, it helps to remember China's political and economic situation in the 1930s, which was more tenuous than that of the still-colonial subcontinent. to my understanding, China's "film industry" was more like several atomized municipal industries centered in cities like Shanghai and Hong Kong. they were always fairly undercapitalized, and definitely not well-coordinated. it's a wonder, frankly, that the Shanghai cinema was able to import and utilize synch-sound equipment as soon as they did.

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neilist
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 5:09 am
Location: Cambridge, UK

Re: German Filmmuseum Edition

#665 Post by neilist » Sat Sep 29, 2018 2:26 pm

Another very interesting sounding new release...
'Deutschland Dada' & 'John Heartfield, Fotomonteur' & 'Happening, Kunst, Protest 1968'

"Related in theme and form, these three documentaries Germany Dada (1969), John Heartfield: Photomontage Artist (1977) and 1968: Art, Protest, Happening (1981) can be seen as a trilogy on the history of art in the 20th century. Art historians focus on those rare moments in our German history when radical aesthetics and radical politics briefly went hand in hand. Then the movement of authoritarian political sects on the one hand and the reaction of the authoritarian establishment combined with the voracity of the art market on the other put an end to this beautiful commonality." (Helmut Herbst) The 2-disc DVD set also offers unpublished audio documents of talks with artists like Richard Huelsenbeck, Raoul Hausmann, Joseph Beuys, Wolf Vostell, Allan Kaprow and Al Hansen.

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