745 Don't Look Now

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released by Criterion and the films on them. If it's got a spine number, it's in here. Threads may contain spoilers.
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R0lf
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 7:25 am

Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#51 Post by R0lf » Fri May 01, 2015 12:24 am

Fingers crossed they cast Nic Cage.

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Ribs
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:14 pm

Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#52 Post by Ribs » Fri May 01, 2015 1:37 am

Nah, Kiefer Sutherland, surely? They could even do it as a sequel, the same story but just told again with him as the son from the first one, still haunted by the imagery of the red cape! No? Anyone?

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PfR73
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 6:07 pm

Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#53 Post by PfR73 » Mon Sep 21, 2015 8:57 pm

Roger Ryan wrote:
Dark Horse 77 wrote:A question about the first supplement on disc 2 entitled Don't Look Back: Looking Back:

I watched it the other night and there is no color for the 20 minute documentary. Is this a stylistic decision or could it be a defect?
Actually, there is a bit of color...the color red (note the appearance of the figure in the red raincoat sitting in the church pew behind the right shoulder of Nicolas Roeg during his interview segments). At one point in the interview, Roeg notes that they made a conscious effort to eliminate other colors during the shots of the figure in the red raincoat to emphasize the coat. I believe the producers of the documentary took that idea to heart and electronically drained all of the color from the program apart from the objects colored red. That this appears to have affected the film clips as well demonstrates that not a lot of care was taken in this stylistic choice. It also doesn't help that the documentary looks like it was produced in standard definition and the interlaced transfer used on the Criterion disc is weak.
I think Criterion just used a very bad source. This featurette is also on the UK Blu-Ray with perfectly normal color. On the UK disc, it opens with the credit "Blue Underground Presents." The Criterion disc opens with the credit "Severin Films Presents."

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Mr Sausage
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Don't Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)

#54 Post by Mr Sausage » Mon Mar 14, 2016 6:18 am

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swo17
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Re: Don't Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)

#55 Post by swo17 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 1:49 pm

I don't believe this film's title is intended to be taken literally.

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MichaelB
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Re: Don't Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)

#56 Post by MichaelB » Fri Mar 25, 2016 5:33 am

If I remember rightly, it's the first three words of the original short story.

Werewolf by Night

Re: Don't Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)

#57 Post by Werewolf by Night » Fri Mar 25, 2016 4:07 pm


oh yeah
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 7:45 pm

Re: Don't Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)

#58 Post by oh yeah » Fri Mar 25, 2016 6:59 pm

This is my favorite Roeg film (and one of my favorite films by anyone) because it puts his talents to such perfect use. Basically he's a very visceral director, using whatever camera or editing tricks will allow him to jolt the audience into an emotional reaction, no matter how "dated" or "self-conscious" they may seem to some contemporary viewers (e.g. the rampant use of zooms or his signature style of non-linear editing). More than perhaps any other horror film I can recall offhand, Don't Look Now shakes me to the core because of its uneasy, deliberately fractured and imperfect aesthetic which makes it truly feel like we're watching things through the queasy, nervous eyes of John Baxter. The use of handheld throughout in particular gives the film a precarious feel, as if we too could fall off a scaffold from a great height at any moment. Nothing ever feels safe or grounded or "right"; Roeg suffuses the entire film in a bath of pure unease. Of course the off-season Venice setting works wonders in adding to the gloomy, haunted atmosphere; it's one of the most memorable cities depicted on film, and certainly one of the eeriest. Various images recur throughout and taunt us with their elusiveness: broken glass, water, the color red. The film is almost abstract in its play of symbols and signs, its infamous editing rhythms which feel like they're trying to mimic all the confusion and trouble of the grieving, doubting mind of John.

The first time I saw the film I was utterly crushed by the ending. I couldn't get the film out of my head for weeks, months even; it was one of the very few movies to actually shake me up, to scare me and haunt my mind afterwards too. I don't know if it has quite the same effect now, but it retains its nauseous, dread-filled power. A very disquieting film which captures a certain deeply Gothic essence like few other horror flicks.

However I wonder if some may feel that the film is too cynical or fatalistic in the way it sends John to his doom for not realizing the error of his ways? I think it overcomes this partly by how humanized John and Laura are, they're not just another couple of lambs to the horror-film slaughter, they feel like actual real people. Also, to not have John die would kind of defeat the whole narrative and thematic point of the film, of not realizing the truth until it's too late, of doubting one's own gifts. Does this advocate a kind of quasi-Christian line of thought, though? That those, like John, who don't "believe" (in his case, in his own ESP), will end up dead. I think you can bypass this by arguing that the film is not meant to be taken that literally, though.

Rich Malloy
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 12:29 pm
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Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#59 Post by Rich Malloy » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:19 pm

I was hoping to pick this up during the BN sale or at Amazon, but it’s been unavailable from either place.

It’s sold out at Best Buy, deepdiscount, Target claims to have 1 copy, Walmart says 4 (much higher prices naturally).

Are we in between printings on this? Not oop, right?

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PfR73
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Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#60 Post by PfR73 » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:57 pm

Roeg's passing probably caused an uptick in sales.

Peter McM
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Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#61 Post by Peter McM » Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:30 pm

PfR73 wrote:
Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:57 pm
Roeg's passing probably caused an uptick in sales.
You're probably right; found one copy of Don't Look Now at my B&N, and no copies of Insignificance. Now what we need is a Bad Timing upgrade.

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Big Ben
Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:54 pm
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Re: 745 Don't Look Now

#62 Post by Big Ben » Fri Dec 14, 2018 4:31 pm

Peter McM wrote:
Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:30 pm
PfR73 wrote:
Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:57 pm
Roeg's passing probably caused an uptick in sales.
You're probably right; found one copy of Don't Look Now at my B&N, and no copies of Insignificance. Now what we need is a Bad Timing upgrade.
I think a master exists. Doesn't Insignificance have footage of it on one of the special features?

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